INSIDE:

NEWS/STORIES/ARTICLES
Book Reviews
Columns/Opinion/Cartoon
Films
Covid Information
International
National

NW/Local
Recipes
Special A.C.E. Stories

Sports
Online Paper (PDF)

CLASSIFIED SECTION
Bids & Public Notices

NW Job Market

NW RESOURCE GUIDE

Consulates
Organizations
Scholarships
Special Sections

Asian Reporter Info

About Us

Advertising Info.

Contact Us
Subscription Info. & Back Issues


FOLLOW US
Facebook

Twitter

 

 

ASIA LINKS
Currency Exchange

Time Zones
More Asian Links
 


Copyright © 1990 - 2021
AR Home

 


Where EAST meets the Northwest


 

When will COVID-19 vaccines be widely available globally?

By Victoria Milko

The Associated Press

www.asianreporter.com

May 19, 2021

WASHINGTON (AP) — When will COVID-19 vaccines be widely available globally?

Experts say it could be 2023 or later before the shots are widely available in some countries.

The United States, Israel, and the United Kingdom are among the nations where about half or more of the population has received at least one shot. In some countries, including South Africa, Pakistan, and Venezuela, less than 1% of people have been vaccinated. In nearly a dozen countries — mostly in Africa — there have been no jabs at all.

The differences reflect a mix of factors including purchasing power, domestic production capacity, access to raw materials, and global intellectual property laws.

The U.S. has supported waiving intellectual property protection for the vaccines. But it’s not clear whether there will be global agreement on the issue and, if so, whether that would help speed up production.

COVAX, a U.N.-backed project to ensure vaccine access globally, has run drastically behind schedule due in part to export bans and stockpiling by some countries.

In April, researchers at Duke University said that, even with assistance from COVAX, many countries would not be able to reach 60% coverage until 2023 or later.

"The U.S., European, and other wealthy nations long ago pre-ordered nearly all the doses available and now other countries, even with the money to buy, are at the back of line waiting," said Matthew Kavanagh, a global health policy expert at Georgetown University.

China, Russia, and the U.S. are among countries that have committed to donating vaccines to other nations, but global scarcity is expected to continue for years to come.

"There is simply not enough vaccine to go around," Kavanagh said.

 

 

Read the current issue of The Asian Reporter in its entirety!
Just visit <www.asianreporter.com/completepaper.htm>!